The purpose of this seminar, is to offer the "new" advanced self-defense students a better understanding of "advanced self-defense". The instructor should explain to the new advanced self-defense students that this phase of training is only practiced after the new students have developed their skills in a basic self-defense class.

Self-defense techniques are not only the most interesting in Tae Kwon Do, but also the most advanced. They are, in every sense, a practical form of defense. Advanced self-defense techniques are the logical application of various motions acquired from patterns, sparring and fundamental movements to be used against a "sudden attack" by an armed or unarmed opponent.

Tae Kwon Do, which was taken from it’s "Jutsu" origins was developed in it’s "Do" form in the military, the 29th. crack infantry division in Seoul, Korea. Because of it’s military development, the training was divided into military segments and called the "Cycle of Tae Kwon Do". General Choi Hong Hi, the author of the book Tae Kwon Do, explains the cycle:

  • Fundamental movements = Individual soldier’s basic training 
  • Training exercises = Maintenance of equipment 
  • Patterns = Platoon tactics 
  • Sparring = Field exercise in simulated combat conditions 
  • Self-defense = Actual combat

A defender must know how to make use of his opponent’s momentum and force, while utilizing his dynamic and reflexive actions against a momentarily undefeated opponent. Advanced self-defense techniques can only be effective if the student takes the time to train under realistic conditions. When Tae Kwon Do was developed, it was called: Tae Kwon Do, the art of self-defense

Listed below are a few suggestions that will help the new advanced self-defense students have a better understanding about advanced self-defense:

Self-defense diagram:

Defense Against a Sudden Attack:

  • An unexpected attack may happen at any time and any place, from one attacker or multiple attackers, from one direction or different directions. The attacker will usually have the initial advantage because of the element of surprise. A well-trained student, however; who has developed an instinctive conditioned reflex increases the odds of blocking the initial attack. Listed below are a few hypothetical scenarios to practice a defense against a "sudden attack":
  1. Defender is seated 
  2. Defender is standing 
  3. Defender is attacked by an armed attacker 
  4. Defender is attacked by multiple attackers 
  5. Defender uses his surroundings as a defense

How to Release from a Grab or Hold:

  • In most cases, the "act of self-defense" is usually against a larger and stronger opponent. When using a releasing technique against a larger and stronger opponent, the defender should not attempt to pull but rather to push or re-direct the grabbing hand while coordinating the body to make use of the opponent’s momentum and the instinctive "pulling back motion" by the opponent.
  • There are 3 different methods to successfully release from a grab or hold:
    • Using a direct attack to a vulnerable target 
    • Breaking the joint of the attacking tool 
    • Using a releasing motion
  • Listed below are a few hypothetical scenarios to practice a defense against a "grab or hold" by using a direct attack to a vulnerable target:
  1. Attacker grabs the lapels 
  2. Attacker grabs the wrist 
  3. Attacker grabs the shoulder 
  4. Attacker uses a choke hold 
  5. Attacker uses a head lock hold
  • Listed below are a few hypothetical scenarios to practice a defense against a "grab or hold" by breaking the joint of the attacking tool:
  1. Attacker grabs the lapels 
  2. Attacker grabs the wrist 
  3. Attacker grabs the shoulder 
  4. Attacker uses a choke hold 
  5. Attacker uses a head lock hold
  • Listed below are a few hypothetical scenarios to practice a defense against a "grab or hold" by using a releasing motion:
  1. Attacker grabs the lapels 
  2. Attacker grabs the wrist 
  3. Attacker grabs the shoulder 
  4. Attacker uses a choke hold 
  5. Attacker uses a head lock hold

Take-Down, Throwing and Falling Techniques:

  • Take-down techniques are easy to learn and effect in the art of self-defense. Throwing techniques are used when you do not wish to seriously injury an opponent, but these techniques may still injury the opponent. After the execution of a take-down or a throwing technique, step back to avoid a possible counter-attack. To safely learn the take-down, throwing and falling techniques, it is important to know how to fall properly. The emphasis on falling is placed on learning how to fall without getting hurt and recovering as quickly as possible. Falling is practiced from a standing and sitting position.

 

  • Explain and demonstrate a few take-down techniques and then allow the students to pair-up and practice with each other under the supervision of the instructor.
  • Explain and demonstrate a few throwing techniques and then allow the students to pair-up and practice with each other under the supervision of the instructor.
  • Listed below are the basic principles of falling techniques:
    • Relax the body and fall to the side, rather than the flat of the back 
    • Falling should be done with a rolling motion to distribute the impact 
    • Absorb the shock by striking the ground with the palm of the hand 
    • Tuck the chin into the chest to avoid the head striking the mat 
    • Raise the legs
  • Explain and demonstrate a few cane techniques and then allow the students to pair-up and practice with each other under the supervision of the instructor.

Defense Against an Armed Attacker:

  • Defense against an armed opponent requires the precise execution of a defensive technique. At this point, it is important to caution the new advanced self-defense students, that even when an advanced self-defense student develops the necessary awareness, speed, power, balance and self-confidence to defend against a knife or club, it requires a high degree of training and a lot of luck to defend against a gun. In fact, if it is necessary for the defender to take more than two steps toward the attacker with a gun in order to execute his defense, the "element of surprise" will be lost and the defense will most likely fail.
  • There are 2 basic rules, when you execute a defense against an armed opponent:
    • If a dodge or evasive movement is employed, move away from the direction of the weapon’s line of attack, except in the case of a straight stab or thrust and then move to the side of the weapon’s line of attack. 
    • Gauge your distance precisely. Dodging too far from your opponent may make it impossible to successfully counter-attack. If the attacker is using a staff or any weapon that has a considerable amount of length to it, use even more distance to evade, causing the attacker to have to take an extra step to attack. Compensate for this increased distance by using a minor line to execute a defense and counter-attack.
  • Listed below are a few hypothetical scenarios to practice a defense against an armed attack :
    • Attacker uses a club 
    • Attacker uses a knife 
    • Attacker uses a gun